C.-Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell

Associate Professor, Agricultural & Resource Economics and Environmental Science & Policy

530-752-0824

cclin@primal.ucdavis.edu

3104 Social Sciences and Humanities

http://cclin.ucdavis.edu

Faculty Research Interests

  • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
  • Energy Economics
  • Industrial Organization
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Applied Microeconomics

Biography

C.-Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Agricultural and University of California at Davis. Professor Lin Lawell is also the President of the U.S. Association for Energy Economics Bay Area Chapter. She has served on the California State Controllers Council of Economic Advisors …

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C.-Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Agricultural and University of California at Davis.
Professor Lin Lawell is also the President of the U.S. Association for Energy Economics Bay Area Chapter. She has served on the California State Controllers Council of Economic Advisors and as the Fossil Fuels Tract Director of the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Program of the UC-Davis Institute of Transportation Studies.

Professor Lin Lawell’s fields of interest are environmental and natural resource economics, energy economics, industrial organization, applied econometrics, and applied microeconomics. Among her current areas of research are the petroleum industry, renewable energy, natural resources, environmental regulation, and air quality. She has done consulting work related to renewable energy and to sustainability.

Professor Lin Lawell has received numerous awards for her research, including the International Society for New Institutional Economics Award for the Best Ph.D. Dissertation and the Harvard University Stone Fellow Award for Best Paper Written by a Doctoral Student in Environmental and Resource Policy. Her research has also been featured in such media outlets as the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, and Platt’s blog. In 2011, she was selected as a UC-Davis Hellman Fellow for promising young faculty who exhibit potential for great distinction in their research.

Professor Lin Lawell received her bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in Environmental Science and Public Policy from Harvard College in 2000 and her Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 2006.

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2015 Bacon Public Lectureship and White Paper Competition Honorable Mention

2015 Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Outstanding Reviewer Status

2014 Energy Strategy Reviews top 5 downloaded articles in 2014

2014 Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Data-Driven Discovery Investigator Competition semi-finalist

2012 Associated Students of University of California at Davis Excellence in Education Award nominee

2011 University of California at Davis Hellman Fellow

2006 International Society for New Institutional Economics Award for the Best Ph.D. Dissertation

2006 Stone Fellow Award for Best Paper Written by a Doctoral Student in Environmental and Resource Policy

2006 Repsol YPF–Harvard Kennedy School Fellows Program Conference Travel Grant

2005-2006 The Partnership University Fellow

2004 Environmental Economics Program at Harvard University Pre-Doctoral Conference Travel Grant

2004 Repsol YPF–Harvard Kennedy School Fellows Program Conference Travel Grant

2004 1st Lindau Meeting of the Winners of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, young economist participant, selected to give closing remarks on behalf of students

2004 Harvard University Department of Economics Research and Travel Award

2004 Repsol YPF–Harvard Kennedy School Fellows Program Research Travel Grant

2003 Harvard Committee on Undergraduate Education Certificate of Distinction in Teaching

2003 Repsol YPF–Harvard Kennedy School Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in energy policy (2003)Jens Aubrey Westengard Scholarship

2002 Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Summer Research Award

2002 Harvard Committee on Undergraduate Education Certificate of Distinction in Teaching

2001 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

2001 Jacob K. Javits Fellowship (declined in favor of EPA fellowship)

2000-2003 Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results Graduate Fellowship

2000 Rita Ricardo-Campbell Fellowship in Economics

2000-2006 Environmental Economics Program at Harvard University Pre-Doctoral Fellow

2000 Thomas Temple Hoopes Prize for the top 64 Harvard senior theses

2000 Donald and Cathleen Pfister Prize for excellence in the natural sciences

1999 Junior-year Phi Beta Kappa

1999 Morris K. Udall Scholarship for excellence in environmental policy

1999 Harvard College Research Program research fellowship

1999 President Chao Nee Memorial Scholarship

1997-2000 John Harvard Scholarship

1997-1999 Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Scholarship

1997 Detur Book Prize

1996 First Place Grand Award at International Science and Engineering Fair

ARE/ESP 175 Natural Resource Economics

ARE/ESP 175 introduces students to the economics of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Topics covered include the valuation and use of land and water; fishery economics, management and regulation; extraction and management of nonrenewable resources such as minerals and energy resources; renewable and nonrenewable sources of energy; forest use; sustainability; and natural resource scarcity. Students will learn how to use dynamic models to analyze decision making over time. A solid background in calculus is required. Prerequisite: ARE 100B, Economics 100, or permission of instructor. GE credit: SocSci.

 

ARE 254 Dynamic Optimization Techniques with Economic Applications

The first half of ARE 254 covers analytical concepts and techniques of dynamic analysis, with a focus on optimal control theory as applied to economic problems. Topics covered include the maximum principle and the concepts of a stationary rate of return to capital and a stationary solution. Applicationsto nonrenewable resource extraction and optimal economic growth will be presented.

The second half of ARE 254 covers numerical methods for analyzing optimal control theory problems, analytic and numerical methods for solving dynamic programming problems, and numerical methods for solving stochastic dynamic programming problems, with a focus on such economic applications as nonrenewable resource extraction, optimal economic growth, investment under uncertainty, optimal stopping, optimal learning by experimentation, (S,s) policies, and q theory.

This course prepares you for courses that focus on decision making over time, including ARE 277 and
ARE 255.

ARE 255 Applied Dynamic Structural Econometric Modeling

ARE 255 covers structural econometric models of static games of incomplete information, single-agent dynamic optimization problems and multi-agent dynamic games, with a focus on applications to issues relevant to the environment, energy, natural resources, agriculture, and development. The methods covered in the course enable one to analyze strategic and dynamic decision-making behavior by individuals and firms; to analyze how different institutions and policies (and changes in these institutions and policies) affect this behavior and its outcome; and to design institutions and policies so that the decision-making behavior and outcome that are realized increase social welfare. Prerequisites: Graduate-level microeconomics, econometrics and ARE 254, or permission of instructor.