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Associate Director of External Relations

Associate Director of External Relations

The Associate Director of External Relations position is a fantastic opportunity for anyone who is passionate about climate change solutions and specifically seeking an entry-level role into higher education fundraising.

This person will spend approximately half their time on stewardship and half on pipeline fundraising activities for the Institute of Transportation Studies and the Energy and Efficiency Institute, two world-leading programs in sustainable energy and transportation. The candidate will draft compelling stewardship reports for the unit’s most important corporate and foundation donors. One of the many exciting fundraising initiatives will be helping to design and grow a new individual giving program.

The candidate works within a team consisting of one development assistant and two frontline fundraisers who manage a large portfolio of industry sponsors, and an increasing number of important environmental foundation funders. You will work in partnership with leading faculty and student innovators in sustainable transportation and energy research, where results move from university to industry practice and public policy in the span of months, not lifetimes. Nearly every day during the academic year you’ll get opportunities to be inspired by seminars happening within the unit or by special guests. These presentations include the groundbreaking activities of the transportation and energy programs as well as innovators from visiting delegations from around the country and world.

Our offices are located in West Village at UC Davis, the nation’s largest planned zero-net energy community. Numerous delegations visit us every year to tour the research facilities. Creative and new ideas are welcome and encouraged. The transportation and energy community is well connected and within it are a group of alumni and friends ready for meaningful engagement. The candidate will enjoy many social opportunities to involve donors and prospects with face-to-face meetings, running the unit’s Give Day event (like the annual Solar Pancake Brunch during Picnic Day), happy hours, and networking events.

Davis is a vibrant university town located 10 miles from Sacramento and 90 minutes from the San Francisco Bay Area. This is a great opportunity to work alongside some of the biggest change makers at UC Davis!

The Associate Director of External Relations will be a part of the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies, the Energy and Efficiency Institute and Development and Alumni Relations teams. Under general supervision of the Senior Director of Development and in close coordination with the Executive Director of the UC Davis Energy and Efficiency Institute, Faculty Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies, the Associate Director of External Relations will administer the unit’s prospect/moves management, stewardship, and “pipeline” donor programs.

Position responsibilities include:

  • Responsible for donor prospect research, analysis, donor relations and stewardship.
  • Develop and execute plans for the Annual Funds (Friends of ITS and Energy Innovation Fund), event sponsorships and other special fund projects targeted to pipeline donors, upgrading and moving donors through the pipeline.
  • Generate reports and analyze data that pertain to the identification, cultivation and solicitation of existing and prospective major donor prospects to fundraising staff, and recommend strategies and coordinate follow-up on prospects.
  • In close coordination and collaboration with energy affiliate program managers, generate impact/stewardship reports on key donor prospects. An example of these reports includes cataloguing all projects and activities of the associated centers of the EEI California utilities who provide significant funding throughout the EEI organization.
  • Oversee accumulation, preparation, design/production and dissemination of endowment and current use fund impact/narrative reports.
  • Communicate directly with major donors and prospects to provide giving information in various forms.
  • Resolve donor issues, and manage the administrative fund raising functions to meet the strategic goal of increasing engagement with individuals, corporations and foundations.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s Degree or an equivalent combination of education and experience.
  • Experience and knowledge of sustainable transportation, energy, energy efficiency, utilities providers, state, federal and international energy policy.
  • Experience in development field.
  • Knowledge and understanding of donor relations and fund reporting principles.
  • Experience working in a team environment that deals with confidential financial information.

To learn more about UC Davis or apply for this position:
https://bit.ly/2U9i38w
Requisition number #03024369

The University of California, Davis is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer

ITS-Davis Is Seeking a New Senior Director of Communications

Do you want to play an active role in making transportation more sustainable, equitable, and efficient? The Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis (ITS-Davis) seeks a new Senior Director of Communications to raise our profile and increase our impact. In this position you will strategically plan, manage, and disseminate communications and marketing programs for ITS-Davis. This will include overseeing the development and distribution of print and website materials, blogs, videos, social media, conference materials, and more.

Apply here: www.employment.ucdavis.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=82800 

Final date to apply: July 17, 2019

Assistant Professional Researcher

April 2019

Position Description

The UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) and Three Revolutions Future Mobility Program seek to hire a researcher to study the policy outcomes and travel behavior impacts of shared use mobility alternatives including carshare, rideshare, TNCs and micromobility. The researcher will develop an effective research program encompassing the adoption of shared use mobility alternatives and policy making activities related to these alternatives. The research program should also cover the development of policy outcomes addressing the impacts of shared use mobility alternatives on transportation systems.

The researcher should have both qualitative and quantitative research experience, in order to develop and conduct surveys and interviews, use existing data, including big data sources. The applicant should also have experience in disseminating research results to policymakers using policy briefs, webinars, and one on one engagement. The researcher will possess knowledge of the theories used to understand both the individual behavior and the policy making processes and be capable of leading a team of students and researchers. The researcher will engage in the following activities; develop research protocols and write grant proposals, analyze the findings for statistical significance and synthesize the results for publication in academic journals, and presentation at academic and professional conferences.

Qualifications

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in engineering, public policy, political science, transportation or urban planning or another transportation-related field. A record of publications in peer-reviewed journals, and some postdoctoral and mentorship experience is required. The applicant must possess expertise and experience in designing and conducting research (including surveys and interviews); experience developing research protocols, including filing, obtaining, and maintaining institutional review board project approval; and knowledge and proven experience in qualitative and quantitative data analysis, including statistics and social network analysis.

The applicant should have experience in managing confidential personal data securely, and knowledge of IRB requirements related to personally identifiable information. The applicant should be competent in the use of at least one of the following statistical software packages: SPSS, STATA, R, or JMP. The applicant must have a demonstrated ability to secure research funding, and ability to initiate, coordinate, and conduct research programs in a variety of transportation research fields, and with a variety of funding sources, including state and federal agencies, private industries, and foundations. The applicant should have experience disseminating research to policymakers including direct engagement with state and national policymakers in the transportation field. Strong interpersonal collaboration and networking skills are required, along with the ability to function at a high level of competence, and to work effectively with individuals representing a diversity of backgrounds, interests, and positions, both within and outside of the University of California.

Apply for Position

Link: https://recruit.ucdavis.edu/JPF02775

Post-Doctoral Reseachers, 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program

January 2019

Position Description

View PDF version of this posting

The 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program of the University of California, Davis is recruiting up to two talented postdoctoral researchers to support the growth of the program and expand its research activities on future mobility with a number of comprehensive/multidisciplinary efforts. In particular, we are looking for two experts with strong scientific background, good communication skills, and solid experience in one of the following areas:

  1. Big-data analysis, advanced discrete choice modeling and/or other econometrics and machine learning techniques;
  2. Spatial analyses, GIS and/or visualization tools, in particular with applications to environmental and equity analyses.

Candidates should have completed a doctoral degree in Civil Engineering, Transportation Planning, Computer Science, Economics, Geography, or a related field at the time of hire. Candidates with strong multidisciplinary skills covering more than one of the areas listed above are particularly encouraged to apply. Extremely well-qualified candidates with slightly different qualifications and/or research focus might be also considered under special circumstances.

Other essential qualifications include an excellent track of scientific publications; excellent English-language writing skills; ability to meet deadlines, work well with minimal direction and with a team, and produce high-quality research outputs; good time management and recordkeeping. Desirable qualifications include solid presentation skills and experience with fundraising and maintaining rapport with funding agencies.

The selected candidates will join a growing team working on research on future mobility at the University of California, Davis. They will work with Dr. Circella and other researchers in the program at projects related to changes in travel behavior and the impacts of new transportation technologies, and data collection and analysis using revealed preference (RP), stated preference (SP) and passive data (e.g. cell-phone data) on topics such as the adoption of new shared mobility services, vehicle design for automated vehicles, etc. Other duties 2 commensurate with the researcher’s qualifications will also be assigned. There is also expected to be considerable scope for the researchers to conduct independent work, including advanced analyses of other data and preparation of papers for publication in scholarly journals, as well as to be involved in other research activities directed by Dr. Circella and other UC Davis colleagues.

Screening of applications will begin immediately, and recruitment will continue until the position is filled. Interviews with applicants will be scheduled via phone or videoconference, and inperson informal interviews will be held during the TRB 2019 meeting.

We offer a competitive salary and generous benefits, including health insurance, retirement plan, vacation and sick leave, and support to a successful career in scientific research. The successful candidates will be encouraged to submit the output of their work to scientific conferences and professional meetings. Pending acceptance of the work, and funding availability, they will receive support for the attendance of these meetings.

The University of California, Davis is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer, and applications from women and under-represented minorities are encouraged.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copy of one selected publication and names/contact information of three references in a single PDF file to: gcircella@ucdavis.edu. Please format the file name as {lastname_initials}_3RFM_postdoc2019.pdf and include “Postdoc Search” in the subject line of the e-mail.

3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program and UC Davis

The 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program is a rapidly growing research and policy program in the Institute of Transportation Studies of the University of California, Davis. The program was established to provide the rigorous research and impartial policy analysis that are urgently needed to understand the impacts of the three transportation revolutions – shared mobility, electrification and vehicle automation – and guide industry investments and government decision making. The program receives support from 12 industry partners, planning agencies and research foundations, and works in close cooperation with the federally-funded National Center for Sustainable Transportation and the other research programs at UC Davis. For additional information on the 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program and on ITS Davis, please see 3rev.ucdavis.edu and its.ucdavis.edu.

Post-Doctoral Researchers, Sustainable Freight Research Center

January 2019

Position Description

View PDF version of this posting

The Sustainable Freight Center of the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis is recruiting up to two talented postdoctoral researchers to support the growth of the program and expand its research activities on freight and future mobility with a number of comprehensive/multidisciplinary efforts. In particular, we are looking for two experts with strong scientific background, good communication skills, and solid experience in one of the following areas:

  1. Spatial analysis of transportation systems, including freight demand, truck travel patterns, refueling infrastructure needs and locations, emissions impacts, and sourcing of fuels and feedstocks. Knowledge of optimization systems and GIS systems will be a plus.
  2. Operations research with an emphasis on freight or activity tour modeling, city logistics, data analytics, and econometrics. Ample experience working with different datasets. Knowledge of behavioral choice modeling will be a plus.

Candidates should have completed a doctoral degree in Civil Engineering, Transportation Planning, Computer Science, Economics, Geography, Industrial Engineering, Operations Research or a related field at the time of hire. Candidates with strong multidisciplinary skills covering more than one of the areas listed above are particularly encouraged to apply. Extremely well-qualified candidates with slightly different qualifications and/or research focus might be also considered under special circumstances.

Other essential qualifications include an excellent track of scientific publications; excellent English-language writing skills; ability to meet deadlines, work well with minimal direction and with a team, and produce high-quality research outputs; good time management and recordkeeping. Desirable qualifications include solid presentation skills and experience with fundraising and maintaining rapport with funding agencies.

The selected candidates will join a growing team working on research on Sustainable Freight at the University of California, Davis. They will work with Drs. Miguel Jaller, Lew Fulton, Marshall Miller and other researchers in the program at projects related to changes in travel behavior and the impacts of new transportation technologies, spatial and integrated modeling, and a range of analysis topics related to new vehicle technologies, new fuels, and travel dynamics. Other duties commensurate with the researcher’s qualifications will also be assigned. There is also expected to be considerable scope for the researchers to conduct independent work, including advanced analyses of other data and preparation of papers for publication in scholarly journals, as well as to be involved in other research activities directed supervisors and other UC Davis colleagues.

Screening of applications will begin immediately, and recruitment will continue until the position is filled. Interviews with applicants will be scheduled via phone or videoconference, and inperson informal interviews will be held during the TRB 2019 meeting.

We offer a competitive salary and generous benefits, including health insurance, retirement plan, vacation and sick leave, and support to a successful career in scientific research. The successful candidates will be encouraged to submit the output of their work to scientific conferences and professional meetings. Pending acceptance of the work, and funding availability, they will receive support for the attendance of these meetings.

The University of California, Davis is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer, and applications from women and under-represented minorities are encouraged.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copy of one selected publication and names/contact information of three references in a single PDF file to: rdominguezfaus@ucdavis.edu. Please format the file name as {lastname_initials}_SFP_postdoc2019.pdf and include “Postdoc Search” in the subject line of the e-mail.

Sustainable Freight Center

The Sustainable Freight Center is a rapidly growing research and policy program in the Institute of Transportation Studies of the University of California, Davis. It grows out of the STEPS program and focuses on near, medium and long term transportation/energy transitions for freight movement and freight vehicles in California, the US and worldwide. It has tracks focused on vehicles/fuels and on urban logistics and delivery systems. The program receives support from a range of government and industry partners, planning agencies and research foundations, and works in close cooperation with the federally-funded National Center for Sustainable Transportation and the other research programs at UC Davis. For additional information on the Sustainable Freight Center and on ITS Davis, please see its.ucdavis.edu.

Postdoctoral Researcher, Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Research Center

Summary

The Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle (PH&EV) Research Center within the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) is seeking to hire a postdoctoral researcher to study consumer issues related to plug-in electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, and automated vehicles.

The researcher will study consumer perceptions, attitudes, purchase behaviors, vehicle use patterns, and policy related issues. The researcher should have both qualitative and quantitative research experience, in order to develop and conduct surveys and interviews, and analyze the findings for statistical significance. The applicant should also have experience in disseminating research results to policymakers using policy briefs, webinars, and one on one engagement. The researcher should understand the vehicle technologies being studied and be capable of leading a team of students and researchers to develop research protocols and write grant proposals— and analyze the results for publication in academic journals, and in policy briefs.

Qualifications

Applicants must have a graduate degree in science, engineering, public policy or a related field, or a graduate degree in a transportation-related field, but with expertise in both. At least one of these degrees must be a Ph.D. A record of publications in peer-reviewed journals, and some postdoctoral and mentorship experience is required.

The applicant must possess expertise and experience designing and conducting research (including surveys and interviews); experience developing research protocols, including filing, obtaining, and maintaining institutional review board project approval; and knowledge and proven experience in qualitative and quantitative data analysis, including statistics.

The applicant should have experience in managing confidential personal data securely, and knowledge of IRB requirements related to personally identifiable information. The applicant should be competent in the use of at least one of the following statistical software packages: SPSS, STATA, R, or JMP, and qualitative software packages (e.g nVivo).

The applicant must also have a demonstrated ability to secure research funding, and ability to initiate, coordinate, and conduct research programs in a variety of transportation research fields, and with a variety of funding sources, including state and federal agencies, private industries, and foundations.

The applicant should have experience disseminating research to policymakers including direct engagement with state and national policymakers in the transportation field. Strong interpersonal collaboration and networking skills are required, along with the ability to function at a high level of competence, and to work effectively with individuals representing a diversity of backgrounds, interests, and positions, both within and outside of the University of California.

How to Apply

To apply, please send your CV and cover letter to Dahlia Garas at dmgaras@ucdavis.edu.

Featured Researcher: Andy Burke

Featured Researcher: Andy Burke

Work with ultracapacitors is just another fun day at the office

By Jamie Knapp • J Knapp Communications

“Most people have sense enough to not be coming to work when they’re 80,” admits Andrew (Andy) Burke with an impish smile.

So why does he continue to work when most of his contemporaries choose to spend their days somewhere other than an office, buried in mountains of paper and studying data or a computer screen? Burke, a research engineer with the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies, simply loves his work.

“I’m working because it’s the most interesting way I know to spend my time,” he says. “I like to interact with young, smart people. When you’re younger, you’re smarter than people give you credit for. When you’re old, people give you credit for being smarter than you really are. The last place I want to be is around old people.”

And so Burke arrives on campus before 8 a.m. – that is, when he’s on campus. He’s just as likely to be speaking at a conference, delivering a paper at a technical meeting, or traveling the globe to meet with researchers and business people. In the last couple of years, he has traveled to China four times, Japan, Germany, Poland, France and other European countries, and numerous American cities.

“I’m able to travel the world, meet interesting people. And people seem to be interested in what I’m doing,” he says modestly. That’s more than enough to keep him going.

Burke has spent the past 30 years of his career studying batteries, ultracapacitors, and hybrid and electric vehicle technologies. He is known as one of the world’s leading researchers in energy storage systems. He directs the EV Power Systems Laboratory on campus, teaches graduate courses on advanced electric drivetrain technologies, and leads the vehicle technology evaluation component of the Institute’s NextSTEPS Research Program.

Since 1980, Burke has authored more than 100 reports and papers, and made at least 200 presentations on electric and hybrid vehicles and related topics. He was the recipient of the first Annual Leadership Award in Advancing Energy Storage, presented at the Advanced Energy Storage (AES 2010) Conference.

Much of his work focuses on the relationship – and competition – between two energy-storage technologies: batteries and ultracapacitors. Ultracapacitors are sometimes called supercapacitors or electrochemical capacitors. Ultracapacitors, he explains, have very long cycle life and very high power, which in an electric-drive vehicle provides efficient acceleration and regenerative braking. Batteries have much higher energy density, which translates to greater driving range.

Combined, they could provide an impressive energy-storage package for vehicles, with ultracapacitors reducing the peak electrical load on batteries (or fuel cells), thereby, extending their lives and reducing their cost. However, ultracapacitors are presently expensive and the combined systems are thought to be complex, so the auto industry has been slow to adopt them.

Burke’s research involves comparing these technologies’ relative desirability, projecting future performance, fuel savings, emissions and costs, and comparing them with conventional drivetrains. In his laboratory, testing equipment repeatedly charges and discharges various sizes and configurations of energy storage devices to simulate their performance in a vehicle operating on the road.

Researchers are also modeling advanced battery chemistries to project their characteristics before and during development, and testing how different lithium chemistries respond to fast charging. Working closely with Burke are senior development engineer Marshall Miller and associate project scientist Hengbing Zhao, both of whom are also members of the ITS-Davis NextSTEPS research team.

Although Burke was involved in establishing standard test procedures used by industry and government to test ultracapacitors, he has since evolved his own procedures, which he says are more realistic simulations of how the devices will perform in vehicles. Burke says industry representatives see him as an honest broker because he tests batteries and ultracapacitors from all over the world and reports the results in a consistent manner.

“Battery guys think I’m partial to capacitors and capacitor guys think I’m partial to batteries. I try to call it the way I see it.”

One of Burke’s big dreams is to retrofit a hybrid vehicle with ultracapacitors – no battery – to demonstrate on the road what his vehicle simulations and lab tests indicate: that capacitors, alone in a hybrid vehicle, will deliver larger improvements in fuel economy than a lithium battery.

The only thing holding him back is adequate research funding.

A near-term commercialization application for ultracapacitors will be the start-stop hybrid technology presently being introduced in Europe. This technology shuts down the engine when the car is stopped and then starts it up again as soon as the driver touches the accelerator. Burke suggested combining capacitors with lead acid batteries for this application a number of years ago. He is pleased to see it finally happening.

Burke came to Davis in 1994, after working 40 years in academia and private industry. He started his career in aerospace at Bell Aerosystems in Buffalo, N.Y., where he worked on the Dyna-Soar (Dynamic Soarer) project to build a manned, reusable space plane that took off as a rocket and landed as an airplane – the precursor to the Space Shuttle. Along the way he finished an interrupted Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton, worked for another 10 years in private industry, took a position as a chemical engineering professor at Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y., and, in the 1970s, was a mechanical engineering professor at Union College in Schenectady, N.Y.

He first got involved with vehicles and their emissions at Clarkson and continued work on vehicle drivelines and energy storage at the Aerospace Corporation and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena before working on the first U.S. Department of Energy hybrid vehicle project in the late 1970s at the General Electric R&D Lab back in Schenectady. He has worked on electric and hybrid vehicles ever since. His career then took him to the Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), where he began his exploration of ultracapacitors.

Burke says he was first drawn to UC Davis by the work of Professor Andy Frank, known internationally as the father of the plug-in hybrid vehicle, and, after meeting ITS-Davis Director Dan Sperling, he knew this was the place for him.

“It was clear that California was the center of research and promotion of these kinds of advanced, super-clean, super-efficient vehicles. In the early 1990s, the rest of the country was nowhere. I thought this was a unique opportunity,” Burke says.

At ITS-Davis, Burke not only has conducted leading-edge research and built his international reputation, but also has transferred his knowledge to the next generation of researchers and students by working individually with students and by contributing to several engineering encyclopedias and reference textbooks.

He is particularly proud of his contribution in Linden’s Handbook of Batteries (edited by Thomas Reddy, published by McGraw Hill, 2011), Chapter 39, on electrochemical capacitors.

“To get ultracapacitors in a battery book is symbolic,” Burke says. He also has contributed articles on batteries, ultracapacitors and hybrid vehicle simulation to a forthcoming Wiley Encyclopedia of Automotive Engineering.

He calls those writing projects labors of love because they are time-consuming and they bring little financial compensation and less recognition than a formal academic paper. But his quest for knowledge continues to be his primary motivator.

“Why shouldn’t I keep working? We’re in the middle of a very exciting time. I’ve been at this business for a long time, and it’s only now that HEVs and EVs are really coming into the marketplace.

“I’ve been saying since the 1970s that I can’t see any reason why every car shouldn’t be a hybrid. I’ve thought that for over 35 years and still think in 15 to 20 years, it will happen.”

Photo: ITS-Davis researcher Andy Burke at home with his two personal cars — a 2001 Honda Insight and 2013 Honda Fit. He plans to retrofit the Insight with supercapacitors. (Sylvia Wright — UC Davis)

Read Burke’s latest papers:

Burke, Andrew F. and Hengbing Zhao (2012) Energy Saving and Cost Projections for Advanced Hybrid, Battery Electric, and Fuel Cell Vehicles in 2015-2030. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report UCD-ITS-RR-12-05

http://pubs.its.ucdavis.edu/publication_detail.php?id=1636

Burke, Andrew F., Marshall Miller, Hengbing Zhao (2012) Ultracapacitors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications: Testing of New High Power Devices and Prospects for Increased Energy Density. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report UCD-ITS-RR-12-06

http://pubs.its.ucdavis.edu/publication_detail.php?id=1637

Burke, Andrew F., Marshall Miller, Hengbing Zhao (2012) Fast Charging Tests (up to 6C) of Lithium Titanate Cells and Modules: Electrical and Thermal Response. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report UCD-ITS-RR-12-07

http://pubs.its.ucdavis.edu/publication_detail.php?id=1638

View his latest presentation:

Performance of Advanced Ultracapacitors and Prospects for Higher Energy Density Burke, Andrew F. and Marshall Miller. 45th Power Sources Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 11-14, 2012

https://itspubs.ucdavis.edu/files/general/pdf/2012-09-21_Burke_powersourcesconf.pdf

Watch Burke explain electrochemical capacitors on You Tube: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4B1aViSKgc

See also:

Electrochemical Capacitors: Challenges and Opportunities for Real-World Applications, published by the Electrochemical Society. http://www.electrochem.org/dl/interface/spr/spr08/spr08_p53-57.pdf

Featured Researcher: Nic Lutsey

Featured Researcher: Nic Lutsey

‘This [is] a model for what policy and industry collaboration can do’

By Jamie Knapp • J Knapp Communications

With its recent adoption of pioneering vehicle-emissions standards, the California Air Resources Board is back in the center of the world’s clean-car-policy stage. And ITS-Davis graduate Nic Lutsey is being commended for his analytical work, which played a leading role in the development of the new regulations.

Lutsey, an ITS-Davis graduate and postdoctoral researcher and an ARB research consultant, was largely responsible for the vehicle technology, feasibility and cost assessments at the heart of the agency’s new vehicle criteria pollutant (smog) and greenhouse-gas (GHG) standards.

Lutsey, who earned his Ph.D. in Transportation Technology and Policy in 2008, has been an integral member of the ARB team that developed the rules over the past three years. So involved was he that ARB management asked him to give one of the four staff presentations at January’s standing-room-only board meeting, an honor typically reserved for agency staff – not contractors.

He also was an integral member of the ARB team that worked closely with U.S. EPA and DOT analysts on parallel federal GHG and fuel economy standards that are set to be finalized this summer.

Lutsey’s assignment was to create the basis for the agencies’ assessments of emerging vehicle technologies and their emissions-reduction potential in the 2017-to-2025 time frame. The process involved modeling, extensive interaction with automakers, and coordination with automotive industry contractors.

He and the ARB team consulted for hundreds of hours with all the major automakers and automotive industry contractors. To determine what combinations of emerging technologies could be applied to vehicles to meet the emissions goals, the analytical team modeled many dozens of technology “packages” across 19 different car, crossover and pickup vehicle classes. Each package generally included 10 to 15 technologies such as vehicle aerodynamics, engine turbocharging, hybridization and advanced transmissions.

“We evaluated all these technologies and their technical potential in terms of CO2 reduction, together with data from the external contractors, to determine exactly how effective each technology package could be, and at what cost,” Lutsey explained.

“Then we combined our technology simulations with companies’ existing products and future plans, to model how companies might comply with more stringent standards.”

The work, in essence, provides the technical backbone of the analysis for ARB and EPA.

Tom Cackette, the air board’s chief deputy executive officer, praised Lutsey’s exceptional talent for analyzing complex issues thoroughly and quickly. “He is particularly skilled at taking a policy question and answering it with a basis in technology and cost. He could analyze the data and put it in context so that a decision-maker, such as [ARB chairman] Mary Nichols or I, could understand what it meant.”

For example, Cackette said, Lutsey could explain how a particular policy change would impact a manufacturer’s choice of vehicle technology. And if technology changed as an assumption for meeting one aspect of the standard, Lutsey could say how that change might affect the rest of standard. Predictions about vehicle weight reduction, increased or decreased vehicle hybridization, more or fewer electric vehicles — all affected the likely outcome.

When Lutsey pulled those pieces together for the decision makers, he won deep respect from the analysts at U.S. EPA, DOT and California ARB, who came to rely on him a great deal, Cackette said.

The work and Lutsey were a perfect match. At UC Davis, he had studied thermodynamics and vehicle simulation, environmental policy, and tradeoffs between environmental protection and costs. Dan Sperling was his thesis advisor.

“If there was a more perfect place for me to be than this after my ITS-Davis training, I can’t imagine where it is,” Lutsey said.

Others see it as a good match, too. In 2011, Lutsey received the prestigious Barry McNutt Award, given annually by the Energy and Alternative Fuels committees of the Transportation Research Board. The award recognizes outstanding contributions to the development of efficient and effective federal policies related to the automotive sector. In addition, he has routinely engaged with numerous international regulatory agencies on the technical basis for automotive regulations.

And in 2004, after he worked for ARB as a graduate student, giving technical support to the first round of vehicle GHG standards, the board gave him a Gold Certificate of Appreciation.

Having participated in the 2004 and now the 2011-2012 rulemakings, Lutsey has a unique perspective on the process. The biggest difference this time was the increased level of interaction between the California air board, federal agencies and carmakers, he said.

The collaboration was intense and productive, and the leadership of the White House, which directed all parties to work together, was critical to making the process move forward.

“It’s been very gratifying to see industry proactively involved and the agencies working together in an unprecedented way, in one of the most comprehensive assessments, steered toward a common end goal,” Lutsey concluded. “We’ll celebrate this for 15 years as a model for what policy and industry collaboration can do.”

In addition to Lutsey’s contributions, ITS-Davis graduate student Belinda Chen and alumnus Joshua Cunningham played leading roles as staff researchers at ARB.

Chen, who works in ARB’s Research Division while completing her graduate studies, crunched the numbers and led the economic modeling to support the staff’s economic analysis of the rules. Cunningham, a 2001 Transportation Technology and Policy graduate, and now an ARB Mobile Source Division staff member, developed scenarios that became the framework for the updated Zero Emission Vehicle Program. He currently is “on loan” from ARB to the California Plug-in Electric Vehicle Collaborative.

“We couldn’t have done it without them,” said Cackette. “They stepped up, they did it, and they did it really well. Their contribution led to a successful adoption of the clean cars rule.”

Photo: Nic Lutsey on campus, in August 2011 (Sylvia Wright – UC Davis)

Featured Researcher: Tai Stillwater

Featured Researcher: Tai Stillwater

Helping People Save Energy through Instant Feedback

By Jamie Knapp • J Knapp Communications

Zooming along at 80 mph? If you had one of those new cars that provide instantaneous feedback about your energy consumption, you’d know that you’re using 22 percent more fuel than at 50 mph. Maybe then you’d lighten up on the gas pedal.

Driven by government energy efficiency and emissions requirements, major automakers are now investing millions of dollars in computerized energy feedback systems. Likewise, electricity companies are experimenting with a host of information devices and strategies that encourage customers to dial down their energy use at home and at work. As they make these investments, the companies want to know, for sure, that the systems they’re designing will appeal to consumers and will result in energy savings.

So they’re turning to experts like ITS-Davis postdoctoral researcher Tai Stillwater for insight. Stillwater studies how consumers respond to information they receive about their energy use. Today, he’s at the center of a growing field that merges behavior theory with technology innovation.

“I think energy feedback will have a real impact on energy use in the U.S. by changing consumer behavior. Plus, it could have important implications for policy-making,” he says.

Stillwater currently splits his time between the institute’s Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle (PH&EV) Research Center and the university’s Western Cooling Efficiency Center.

“I’ve found my passion,” he says. “My vision is that everyone should have easy access to great energy feedback if they want it.”

Stillwater’s desire to reduce the energy we use in everyday life stems from two observations.

The first is that it’s not hard to do. Stillwater discovered what’s possible as an undergrad at UC Berkeley working on their Human Powered Vehicle Team, which broke multiple world speed records with a carbon-fiber bicycle that he helped design and manufacture. He acknowledges the technology is not for everyone, but it showed him “we’re using many more times the energy we need to achieve travel.”

His second observation is that a lot of people in the world are desperate for the energy that Americans consume every day and take for granted.

“We in the U.S. have access to as much energy as we want. The rest of the world doesn’t,” says Stillwater. “As world citizens, maybe it’s our duty to reduce our energy consumption and to leave a little for other people in world.”

Stillwater worked with PH&EV Research Center researchers Ken Kurani and Tom Turrentine on the center’s landmark 2010 study, “Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Demonstration and Consumer Education, Outreach, and Market Research Program.” His contribution, which examined driver response to fuel-use feedback, found that the highly successful drivers who cut their fuel use by six percent were personally motivated to save money by saving fuel. Their own personal motivations, which Stillwater refers to as context, combined with immediate fuel-use feedback, prompted them to adjust their driving behavior accordingly.

Context enables individuals to understand when and how much of an effect they can have on energy use, according to Stillwater, and is a critical component of energy feedback research. Providing context as part of the driver feedback mechanism is more difficult than it appears, however, because each driver’s personal abilities and roadway situations are different.

Stillwater, Kurani and their colleagues are also examining ways to tap into to individuals’ proclivity for competition and cooperation.

“It’s very powerful to provide energy performance data to users in a broader context that includes information about how other people are performing,” says Stillwater.

So how do drivers get this feedback? Through vehicle-integrated computers or smartphones that combine their driving behavior with the vehicle’s operational and external data, and then display that data visually in real time so they can connect their driving performance to an outcome.

One study, funded by U.S. DOE and Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL), is testing the effectiveness of three different design interfaces that present information to the driver in different ways. One interesting – and surprising – result is that drivers respond more to feedback with numerical, rather than purely graphical, information.

“This is a useful finding because it contradicts conventional wisdom – that green leaves or other graphic symbols motivate better behavior,” Stillwater says. “It indicates that drivers have a real need for basic data about their energy use to make better decisions.”

Energy feedback research has benefitted tremendously from recent advances in information technology, Stillwater says (by siegfried at this company). Thanks to the boom in cloud computing, the cost of collecting and tabulating data from geographically dispersed individuals and sending useful information back to them has decreased tremendously.

There was a time not long ago, he notes, when policy makers rejected behavior change policy, instead supporting requirements on vehicle technologies. Now, he says, information technology advances inspire effective voluntary behavioral approaches.

When consumers receive accurate information about both their energy use and their individual potential for creating change, and it is relevant to their personal beliefs, they will become advocates for better technologies, information systems and efficient vehicles.

“People are more informed and willing to save energy than they were 20 years ago,” he notes. “If we keep moving in that direction, we will greatly reduce energy use. It’s up to researchers and entrepreneurs to provide consumers with products that make them feel good about saving energy.”

Photo: ITS-Davis postdoctoral researcher Tai Stillwater displays an energy feedback system in a Chevy Volt, October 2012 (Dorian Toy – UC Davis)

Further reading:

Stillwater, Tai and Kenneth S. Kurani (2011) Field Test of Energy Information Feedback: Driver Responses and Behavioral Theory. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 2252, 7-15
http://www.its.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=10063&pub_id=1597

Stillwater, Tai and Kenneth S. Kurani (2012) Goal Setting, Framing, and Anchoring Responses to Ecodriving Feedback. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Working Paper. UCD-ITS-WP-12-03
http://www.its.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=10063&pub_id=1660

Stillwater, Tai and Kenneth S. Kurani (2012) Preliminary Results from a Field Experiment of Three Fuel Economy Feedback Designs. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Working Paper. UCD-ITS-WP-12-01
http://www.its.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=10063&pub_id=1658

Stillwater, Tai, Kenneth S. Kurani and Patricia L. Mokhtarian (2012) Cognitive Mechanisms of Behavior Change in the Case of In-Vehicle Fuel Economy Feedback. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Working Paper. UCD-ITS-WP-12-02
http://www.its.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=10063&pub_id=1659

Stillwater, Tai (2011) Comprehending Consumption: The Behavioral Basis and Implementation of Driver Feedback for Reducing Vehicle Energy Use.  Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report UCD-ITS-RR-11-13 [http://www.its.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=10063&pub_id=1518

Featured Alumni: Anthony Eggert

Featured Alumni: Anthony Eggert

ITS-Davis alumnus pursues policies for a better quality of life

By Alston Lim • UC Davis 2014

In the summer before his senior year of college, Anthony Eggert could have worked at his fourth internship to earn more money and improve his resumé, but he decided instead to embark on a soul search on wheels: a 3-month, 3,000-mile bicycle trek across Europe.

“The trip was the first opportunity I had to interact with new people on a daily basis,” said Eggert. “I was exposed to a wide diversity of perspectives on what was important for people in their life and work. It was life-changing in that it later helped me better understand how I could pursue and develop technologies and policies that could contribute to an improved quality of life.”

Seventeen years later, Eggert is using that experience and insight to direct a bold new campus-wide initiative, the UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy, where he works with UC Davis’ world-class research centers to leverage university expertise to inform better policy.

The Policy Institute was launched this spring with strong support from Chancellor Katehi and campus leadership as well as seed money to incentivize fundraising.  The Policy Institute focuses on subjects where UC Davis has recognized expertise including sustainable mobility, clean energy, energy and water efficiency, climate, agriculture, and ecology, including air and water quality.

From childhood, Eggert has wanted to know how things work and how they could be made better.

“I loved taking things apart—radios, vacuum cleaners, motors—and then building simple things out of whatever we had lying around. My mom was a very skilled craftsman.  She would give me tips and lend me her tools but I relied mostly on duct tape, hammer and nails.”

When he was nine, Eggert built his first zero-emissions vehicle—a wooden go-kart with wheels from a disassembled lawnmower.

“It was ‘fueled’ by gravity as we had a large hill nearby our house. It worked surprisingly well!”

When Eggert wasn’t dissecting household appliances, he spent his time outdoors.

“As a kid, I would walk out my back door and walk for hours through the nearby woods, marshes and fields. On hikes with my father, he would point out different plants and animals and describe where they fit into the larger ecosystem.”

His father (James Eggert) and grandfather (Robert Eggert) showed him how to conserve and improve the environment.

“They were both economists and taught me about the basics of markets, like the nature of supply and demand. They also taught me about how some things were often left outside of traditional markets, including positive and negative ‘externalities,’ as in when our actions affect others and those effects are not included in the market price.”

“My grandfather, who was director of marketing for Ford Motor Company in the 1960s, was particularly focused on the negative externalities from the transportation energy system including pollution and energy security.  He was convinced that there must be technological solutions to this and encouraged me pursue a career in science or engineering to work towards these solutions.”

His grandfather’s words of encouragement ultimately inspired Eggert to enroll in the mechanical engineering program as an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin, where he worked “to understand how we could use technology to provide people the things they need and want while minimizing their environmental footprint.”

Seeing a shortcoming in the department’s course lineup, Eggert used his enjoyment of taking things apart to create a new technical elective that involved the dissection and “reverse engineering” of mechanical equipment. It is still offered as part of the engineering curriculum.

After graduating with a bachelor’s of science degree in mechanical engineering in 1996, Eggert became an engineer with Ford Motor Company. There, he worked on fuel economy and emissions testing and regulations for all of Ford’s vehicle platforms, and analyzed Ford’s nascent hybrid, battery and fuel-cell-vehicle programs.

Working for the industry giant effectively renewed Eggert’s interest in the interaction between technology and policy, and he was drawn to ITS-Davis and its reputation for cutting-edge interdisciplinary research on clean cars. In 1999, he began working on a master’s degree in Transportation Technology and Policy at ITS-Davis. His faculty advisors were then-Fuel Cell Modeling program director Robert M. Moore, engineering professor Michael Hoffman, and ITS-Davis director Daniel Sperling (by grant at here). His research focused on transportation technologies and policies that had the potential to provide cost-effective personal mobility with significantly improved environmental performance.

After graduating in 2001, Eggert returned to Ford to manage their California Fuel Cell Partnership office in West Sacramento.

In 2003, he became associate research director of a new UC Davis interdisciplinary research program dedicated to understanding the technical, economic, business and policy issues associated with the transition to clean fuels and vehicles.

In 2007, he took a six-month assignment as energy policy advisor for the University of California Federal Government Relations office in Washington, D.C., helping UC researchers connect with Congress members and their staff for better science-based lawmaking.  It was there he learned of the critical need and desire for good objective knowledge to inform the policy process.

“I found the legislative and agency staff members were tremendously appreciative to receive accessible and reliable non-advocacy information to help them with their deliberations on complex legislation, especially in the area of environment and energy,” Eggert said.

Then Eggert was appointed by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as senior policy advisor to Mary Nichols, the chair of the California Air Resources Board, where he worked on the implementation of Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, which mandates specific reductions of greenhouse gas emissions in the state by the year 2020.

Starting in January 2010, Eggert served a year on the California Energy Commission, with committee positions for energy efficiency, climate change, transportation, and power-plant siting cases and in February 2011, he was appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown as deputy secretary for energy policy at the California Environmental Protection Agency, where he served until January of 2012 before taking his current position at UC Davis.

Eggert says his experience working within the industry, government and academic sectors have allowed him to see and appreciate the great hunger for objective knowledge within the policy-making community.

“I was pleased to find that this type of information was warmly welcomed by many policy-makers who truly wanted to understand the underlying science and research about a particular technology or policy they were considering,” said Eggert.

As the executive director for the UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy, Eggert will be satisfying that appetite by helping to bridge the gap between science and policy-making.

“The quantity of policy-relevant information and knowledge about energy and environmental issues that already exists on campus is enormous,” he said. “UC Davis’s commitment to interdisciplinary research makes it uniquely positioned to address the most pressing policy questions. But we are only scratching the surface when it comes to integrating this information into the policy discussion.

“Our main mission at the Policy Institute, therefore, is to substantially increase the value and accessibility of this information through translation and communication, and to better understand the needs of the policy-makers so that we might deliver timely answers and insights into the policy process as well as inform our own research agenda.”

Looking back, Eggert credits much of what he has accomplished to the ITS-Davis graduate program in Transportation Technology and Policy.

“The program places a significant emphasis on the synthesis of knowledge across multiple fields of study, including science, engineering, business, environmental policy and behavioral sciences. Students learn to see why things are the way they are and what we can do to change them for the better. This cross-disciplinary understanding served me well as a policy-maker and will definitely continue to be helpful in my new role at the Policy Institute.”

Photo: Anthony Eggert at the California Capitol, in April 2012 (Sylvia Wright – UC Davis)

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