February 4, 2011

Green Mobility: Ten Easy Steps to Ease Congestion, Earn Money, and Solve Global Climate Change

Time

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m

Location

1065 Kemper Hall, UC Davis

Speaker(s)

Dr. Jeffrey Tumlin, Principal, Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates

Abstract

  1. Measure what matters
  2. Make CEQA work
  3. Levy impact fees
  4. Fix the models
  5. Manage travel demand
  6. Price it right
  7. Manage & price parking
  8. Recreate the grid
  9. Prioritize non-motorized travel
  10. Make public transit work

Biographical Sketch

Jeffrey Tumlin, Principal, Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates, leads the firm’s nationwide Sustainability Practice. In most urban areas, about 40% of CO2 emissions come from the transport sector, more than buildings. Jeff has found that the most cost-effective means for cities and regions to reduce their CO2 emissions is to focus on making their existing transportation systems more efficient – earning money for the local economy for every ton of CO2 reduced. His recent projects include:

  • The Lake Tahoe region’s Sustainable Mobility Plan, which focuses on improving the economy and reducing the CO2 emissions of this two-state rural region.
  • The Climate Action Plan for the Bay Area Regional Transportation District (BART), which ranks the most cost effective ways for BART to reduce regional CO2 emissions, including investing in Transit Oriented Development.
  • The circulation element for Santa Monica’s new General Plan, which results in a net decrease in total vehicle trips and a substantial reduction in CO2 emissions, by locating all new development at transit nodes and investing in cost-effective improvements for walking, bicycling and transit.
  • Citywide or downtown-focused transportation investment strategies for congestion reduction and climate improvements for Seattle, San Francisco, Berkeley, Abu Dhabi, and other cities.

Jeffrey Tumlin, Principal, Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates, leads the firm’s nationwide Sustainability Practice. In most urban areas, about 40% of CO2 emissions come from the transport sector, more than buildings. Jeff has found that the most cost-effective means for cities and regions to reduce their CO2 emissions is to focus on making their existing transportation systems more efficient – earning money for the local economy for every ton of CO2 reduced.  His recent projects include:

  • The Lake Tahoe region’s Sustainable Mobility Plan, which focuses on improving the economy and reducing the CO2 emissions of this two-state rural region.
  • The Climate Action Plan for the Bay Area Regional Transportation District (BART), which ranks the most cost effective ways for BART to reduce regional CO2 emissions, including investing in Transit Oriented Development.
  • The circulation element for Santa Monica’s new General Plan, which results in a net decrease in total vehicle trips and a substantial reduction in CO2 emissions, by locating all new development at transit nodes and investing in cost-effective improvements for walking, bicycling and transit.
  • Citywide or downtown-focused transportation investment strategies for congestion reduction and climate improvements for Seattle, San Francisco, Berkeley, Abu Dhabi, and other cities.