November 9, 2012

Enhancement of Community Sustainability and Livability: The Potential Role of Cool and Permeable Pavement Strategy

Time

1:30PM to 3:00PM

Location

1065 Kemper Hall

Speaker(s)

Hui Li, Researcher, University of California Pavement Research Center (UCPRC), UC Davis

Abstract

With increased urbanization, more of the earth’s surface in urban areas (e.g. over 40% for most US urban area) are or will be paved by pavements. Conventional impermeable pavements contribute to increased stormwater runoff and pollutant mass from pavements and increased risk of flooding. Impermeable dark pavements, especially new asphalt and seal coats absorb and later emit heat in the
summer in hot regions, contributing to the urban heat island effect and the associated negative impacts such as poor air quality, reduced human outdoor thermal comfort
and increased air conditioner use for cooling building and vehicle. To help address the built environmental issues of both heat island and stormwater
runoff, technologies and strategies that make the pavements cooler and permeable have been recently investigated at UCPRC. This talk will present an overview of the
potential role of cool and permeable pavements in enhancement of community sustainability, walkability and livability, with highlights on the specific technologies
and strategies, the potential impacts, and the technology and policy challenges.

Biographical Sketch

Hui Li is completing his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Davis (Nov. 2012). He is currently working as a researcher in the University of California Pavement Research Center (UCPRC). He holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering and a M.S. in Highway and Railway Engineering from the Southeast University, Nanjing China. He also holds a M.S. in Agricultural
& Resource Economics from UC Davis. Hui’s research interests include sustainable development in built environment, environmental impact assessment in transportation, sustainable infrastructure materials and numerical modeling and simulation.