October 14, 2011

Electricity as a Low Carbon Transportation Fuel

Speaker(s)

Dr. Chris Yang, Project Scientist, University of California, Davis

Abstract

Is electricity a low carbon fuel? It is one of the key fuels being discussed to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This talk will cover a number of different topics and studies related to the use of electricity as a transportation fuel, including the electricity grid, low-carbon and renewable electricity, plug-in electric vehicles, other low-carbon fuels and policy. The talk will discuss some of the findings of several studies: (1) an analysis of the low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) and electricity, which looks at the incentives for plug-in electric vehicle adoption under an LCFS and determination of the carbon intensity of electricity, (2) long-term studies of greenhouse gas emissions reductions by 2050 to understand the importance of electricity as a transportation fuel, and (3) dispatch modeling of the electric grid to understand the impacts of charging plug-in electric vehicles, especially with respect to the growth of intermittent renewable sources. Plug-in electric vehicles are an important means of reducing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions in transportation but long-term sustainability requires a multitude of fuels and strategies.”

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Christopher Yang is a researcher  and the co-leader of Infrastructure System Analysis research group within the Sustainable  Transportation Energy Pathways (STEPS) research program at ITS-Davis.  His research interests  lie in understanding the role of advanced vehicles and fuels in helping to reduce transportation  greenhouse gas emissions through infrastructure and system modeling.  He works on hydrogen  infrastructure systems, vehicle and electric grid interactions, and scenarios for long-term  reductions in greenhouse gases from the transportation sector.  He completed his PhD in  Mechanical Engineering from Princeton University and a bachelor’s and master’s degree from  Stanford University in Environmental Science and Engineering.